The New Home Economics

Recipe: venison pot pie

2 Comments

Adam’s brother Nigel got a deer last weekend, and gave us a really nice piece of venison.  Here’s what we made (this is adapted from the Better Homes & Gardens cookbook):

Venison Pot Pie
1 pound lean boneless venison
2 T. oil
2 1/2 cups beef stock
1 tsp dried thyme
1 cup frozen peas
1 cup carrots, cubed
1 cup turnips, cubed
1/3 + 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp sugar
3 Tbsp shortening or butter
1/3 cup milk

1. Cut meat into small cubes (about 1/2 in.) and brown in hot oil.

2. Add 2 c. stock, thyme, and a bit of pepper.  Bring to boil, then reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 45 minutes.  Add vegetables and simmer, another 15-30 minutes.

3. Stir together 1/2 c. stock and 1/3 c. flour and stir into meat/vegetable mixture.  Cook and stir until thick and bubbly.  Pour into a casserole dish.

4. While your stuff is simmering, make the biscuits.  Stir together 3/4 c. flour, baking powder, sugar, and a good pinch of salt.  Cut in shortening or butter until it looks crumbly.  Add milk and stir just a bit.  Drop a couple handfuls on top of the meat/vegetable mixture in the casserole.  Bake at 450 degrees F for about 12 minutes or until the biscuits get all golden.

Serves 5-6 people

Here’s a picture of it in the pot.  Adam used our enameled cast iron dutch oven for the entire process.  That thing is awesome!

Variations:  you could substitute any root vegetable for the carrots and potatoes, and/or green beans instead of peas.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Recipe: venison pot pie

  1. That looks awesome. Do you know what cut you used?

    I ask because I may try this recipe. On Wednesday night, I made some steaks (which I think were from the hindquarters) and chops side-by-side. The chops were fantastic and tender, while the made the steaks too tough. It’s possible they came from different animals… The chops may have been from a fawn (venison veal?) and the steaks from an older buck maybe.

    The kids got the chops (loved them, asked for seconds) while Beth and I settled for the steaks.

    • Adam, my Adam says:

      “I believe they were butterflied tenderloin steaks from a mid-sized 6-point buck… It was a nice cut of meat, but since the recipe has you braise the meat for a pretty long time, you could use a lesser cut.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s